Oshawa Garden Club

keeping our community green

Sub-Irrigated Planters (SIP's) - How-to


Steven Biggs, writer and speaker, gave a great talk at the Oshawa Garden Club about easy-to-make planters. Steven mentioned that one very important thing to remember, which is not visible in the photos, is to put a drainage hole at the level of the top of the reservoir. Included here are two pictures, one showing what’s at the bottom of the container, and then another afterwards, once he’s installed a bit of landscape fabric to keep out as much soil as possible. Thanks Steven.


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No Guff Vegetable Gardening

by Steven Biggs

A fun garden is a rewarding garden. (What could be more rewarding than an enquiry about a Promethean plant?!) A practical garden fits into a hectic schedule. No Guff Vegetable Gardening is both fun and practical. Not sure where to start? Try something new (parsnip wine!) or fun—and don’t worry about failure.

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Vote for Canada's National Flower

3 flowers plus banner

Read about the three 'nominees' and then vote using the Survey Monkey link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/8Z9WDW9

What’s the National Flower of Canada?

We have an official tree - the maple, but we do NOT have an official flower! Master Gardeners of Ontario thinks Canada’s 150th birthday is the perfect time to launch a campaign to get one!

Toronto Master Gardeners with help from Todd Boland, Research Horticulturist at Memorial University of Newfoundland, came up with the following three choices for a pan-Canadian flower - one that appears in every province and territory but is not already a provincial or territorial emblem:

Hooded Ladies Tresses (Spiranthes romanzoffiana)
· Unique spiraling flower spike marks this genus
· Found in open wet areas – meadows, bogs, marshes
· Fragrant flowers from July to Sept on 10 to 50 cm stems
· Food source for native bumblebees all through summer

Twinflower (Linnaea borealis)
· Delicate but tough! “borealis” – of the north
· Found in forests, wetlands all over Canada
· Reproduces mainly by spreading stolons
· Fragrant flowers on 15 cm stems for one week in June, attract native bees
· Winter forage for caribou

Bunchberry (Cornus canadensis)
· Changes with the seasons - just like Canada!
· White flowers in spring, red berries in summer, great red-purple fall colour
· Very common in forests and wetlands all over Canada
· Creeping form, 10 to 20 cm tall, great as a native groundcover
· Pollinators include native bumblebees and solitary bees
· Berries are food source for small and large mammals, migratory birds
· Winter forage source for caribou, moose, elk, deer

Voting will close at midnight on June 30th, 2017

Vote now-it only takes a few seconds using this Survey Monkey link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/8Z9WDW9

Plant Sale Video

Member Merle Cole has produced an intro video for the 2017 OGC Plant Sale to be held at the South Oshawa Community Centre (map), May 27th starting at 9am.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QyCY2M3-xvA&feature=youtu.be